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Africa

Guet N'dar, Senegal (October 7, 2022) - Homes and a school have been destroyed by rising seas on Guet N'Dar. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Pulling Back The Curtain On Our Climate Migration Reporting

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Jefferson Ncube, an illegal diamond miner from Zimbabwe, works on his latest tunnel at an abandoned De Beers mine near Kleinzee, South Africa. Ncube is a univeristy graduate, but has been unable to find employment. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Melilla, Spain (October 13, 2022) - A fence runs all around the land border that Melilla, Spain shares with Morocco. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between Africa And Europe

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Chima Williams, an attorney in Nigeria, is one of the winners of this year's Goldman Environmental Prize. He sued Shell over oil spills in his country. Speaking of his activism, Williams notes: "There is power in what you believe and how you go about it uncompromisingly." KC Nwakalor for NPR hide caption

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KC Nwakalor for NPR

He started protesting about his middle school principal. Now he's taking on Big Oil

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Gandiol, Senegal (October 26, 2022) - Mamadou Niang's father worked the land until he died in 2006, and Mamadou would have liked to follow in his father's footsteps. But he can't, he says, because rising seas are pushing salt water into the fields. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

How Rising Seas Turned A Would-be Farmer Into A Climate Migrant

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Mamadou Niang at his home in Gandiol, Senegal, on Oct. 6. Mamadou's father worked their family farmland until he died in 2006, and Mamadou would have liked to follow in his footsteps. But he can't, he says, because rising seas are pushing salt water into the fields. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

He has attempted the journey to Europe three times, and refuses to give up

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Chief of Staff of Ethiopian Armed Forces Field Marshall Birhanu Jula, left, and Head of the Tigray Forces Lt. Gen. Tadesse Werede, right, exchange signed copies of an agreement, at Ethiopian peace talks in Nairobi, Kenya, on Saturday. Brian Inganga/AP hide caption

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Brian Inganga/AP

A medical worker gestures to an Ebola patient inside an isolation center in the village of Madudu, Uganda. The country is taking several public health measures to try to stem the outbreak. Hajarah Nalwadda/AP hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/AP

President Biden takes questions from reporters at the White House on Wednesday. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The midterms went better than expected for Biden. Now he's traveling to Asia

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A farmer chops down what is left of a tree in a burnt forest in Ankazobe, Madagascar, on Saturday. Parts of the forest were set on fire to make way for farming and firewood. Nearly 50 heads of states or governments will take part in climate talks in Egypt at COP27 this week. Alexander Joe/AP hide caption

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Alexander Joe/AP

Afrigen Biologics staff members in the company's lab in Cape Town, South Africa. Afrigen is working on a project to figure out how to manufacture the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine — part of an effort to address global health inequities. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Redwan Hussein (seated left), representative of the Ethiopian government, and Getachew Reda (seated right), representative of the Tigray People's Liberation Front, sign a peace agreement between the two parties in Pretoria, South Africa, Wednesday. Phill Magokoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magokoe/AFP via Getty Images

Lead negotiator for Ethiopia's government Redwan Hussein (left) shakes hands with lead Tigray negotiator Getachew Reda, as Kenya's former president, Uhuru Kenyatta looks on, after the peace talks in Pretoria, South Africa, on Wednesday. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

The Anopheles stephensi mosquito, seen here sitting on a window, is year-round pest that has invaded urban areas in parts of Africa, and has recently been the cause of dramatic outbreaks of malaria in Ethiopia. Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

This urban mosquito threatens to derail the fight against malaria in Africa

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Cargo ships loaded with grain in the anchorage area of the southern entrance to the Bosporus Strait in Istanbul on Monday. Ships left Ukrainian ports on Monday despite Russia's decision to pull out from a landmark deal designed to ease a global food crisis. Ozan Kose/AFP / Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP / Getty Images

An intense global scramble is on to keep Ukraine grain deal alive, as Russia pulls out

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Olha Abakumova, an opera singer from western Ukraine, came to the U.S. with her daughter. (Her husband was not able to migrate.) Olha brought her most treasured sheet music for Ukrainian arias. "They connect me with my motherland, culture and my roots," she says. "When I'm singing, I see pictures in front of my eyes," she says. "The words and music move through me and take me back to Ukraine." Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

Dr. Benjamin Black in front of the Gondama Referral Center in Sierra Leone, where he worked during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. The center treated children and women in urgent need of obstetric and gynecological care. As the outbreak exploded, the center decided to stop admitting pregnant women, a decision that still weighs on Black. Courtesy of Benjamin Black hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Black