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Africa

A man receives a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa, on Monday. The omicron variant, first identified in South Africa, has now spread to at least a dozen other countries. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

Why some researchers think the omicron variant could be the most infectious one yet

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People line up to get on the Air France flight to Paris at OR Tambo's airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday. The United States, Israel and other European nations have already imposed travel restrictions on South Africa and other nations in the region. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

Travelers wearing protective face masks arrive to Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv, Israel on Sunday. Israel on Sunday approved barring entry to foreign nationals as part of its efforts to clamp down on a new coronavirus variant. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AP

People line up to get on an Air France flight to Paris at OR Tambo's airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday as several countries announced travel bans in response to the omicron variant of the coronavirus. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

Specialist Meric Greenbaum, left, works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Black Friday. Stocks dropped after a coronavirus variant appears to be spreading across the globe. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Sudanese anti-coup protesters wave the national flag during a demonstration in the Khartoum-Bahri neighbourhood of the capital, on November 25, 2021. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Thanksgiving is a day at the beach — quite literally — for young Liberians. Above, the beach in West Point is a sandy playing field for soccer lovers. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Nyayua Thang, 62, left, stands waist-deep in the floodwaters in front of an abandoned primary school in South Sudan. Members of her village, displaced by extreme flooding as a result of heavy rainfall, are using the building as a refuge. Only small mud dikes at the entrance of the door are keeping the water out. (November 2020) Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger hide caption

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Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger

South African President Nelson Mandela, left, and Deputy President F.W. de Klerk chat on May 8, 1996, outside Parliament after the approval of South Africa's new constitution. F.W. de Klerk, who oversaw the end of South Africa's country's white minority rule, has died at 85 it was announced Thursday. Mike Hutchings/AP hide caption

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Mike Hutchings/AP

Vanessa Nakate speaks during the climate strike march on October 1, 2021 in Milan, Italy. Stefano Guidi/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefano Guidi/Getty Images

Uganda's Vanessa Nakate says COP26 sidelines nations most affected by climate change

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Winifred Muisyo, right, and her 5-year-old daughter, Patience Kativa, watch Stanlas Kisilu, left, as he installs a TV tuner on the roof of her home. The TV is connected to a solar panel provided by d.light, a company partially funded by climate financing from wealthier nations. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

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Khadija Farah for NPR

This Kenyan family got solar power. High-level climate talks determine who else will

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and his wife Zinash Tayachew take part in a memorial service for the victims of the Tigray conflict organized by the city administration, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on Wednesday. Ethiopian Prime Ministry Office Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopian Prime Ministry Office Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In this photograph issued Saturday by Sierra Leone's National Disaster Management Agency, people gather around the charred oil tanker that exploded after being struck by a truck in the Wellington suburb of Sierra Leone's capital Freetown on Saturday. NDMA via AP hide caption

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NDMA via AP

Sudanese protesters lift national flags as they rally on 60th Street in the capital Khartoum, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of government members, on Oct. 25, 2021. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Sudan's Military Coup Is Threatening Its Long March Toward Democracy

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USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivered a speech on her "new vision" for the agency on Nov. 4 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Ethiopian army units patrol the streets of Mekele in northern Ethiopia's Tigray region in March after the city was captured during an operation against the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF). Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Climate activist Hilda Flavia Nakabuye speaks at the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen in 2019. She and a group of Ugandan activists are calling on high-income countries to commit to bigger and faster emission cuts ahead of COP26, the climate change summit taking place in Glasgow, Scotland, this week. Ole Jensen/Getty Images hide caption

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Ole Jensen/Getty Images

A climate change disaster led this shy 24-year-old from Uganda into activism

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International visitors who fly into the U.S. will have a new set of rules and requirements regarding COVID-19 vaccines, starting Nov. 8. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images