Consider This from NPR Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

Abortion-rights demonstrators yell as they walk down Constitution Avenue during the Bans Off Our Bodies March in Washington, D.C. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Criminal Prosecution Of Pregnancy Loss Expected To Increase Post-Roe

In states across the country, long before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, pregnant people were already being criminally charged, convicted, and imprisoned for loss of pregnancy. Advocates for reproductive rights say this is because laws created to protect pregnant people from violence and abuse are being used to prosecute people whose pregnancies end prematurely.

Criminal Prosecution Of Pregnancy Loss Expected To Increase Post-Roe

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People wait in a TSA line at the John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on Tuesday. Julia Nikhinson/AP hide caption

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Julia Nikhinson/AP

Summer Travel Is Chaos Right Now. Here's Some Reasons Why

As many countries have loosened their COVID-19 restrictions and reopened their borders, the demand for travel is high. Meanwhile, there are hundreds of flights getting canceled and delayed on a daily basis across the globe. A shortage in airline staff, especially pilots, is a big reason why.

Summer Travel Is Chaos Right Now. Here's Some Reasons Why

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People participate in the New York City Pride Parade on Christopher Street on June 26, 2022 in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

The Global Struggle For LGBTQ+ Rights And The People Who Defend Them

While the last few decades have shown major progress when it comes to LGBTQ+ rights globally, queer people have had to continue to fight for them.

The Global Struggle For LGBTQ+ Rights And The People Who Defend Them

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A video of former President Donald Trump is played as Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing by the January 6th Committee. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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What We've Learned From A Month Of January 6th Committee Hearings

Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony before the January 6th committee landed with a bang. The surprise hearing on Tuesday, featuring this aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, was the most powerful evidence to date in the case that House investigators have been building through hours of public hearings.

What We've Learned From A Month Of January 6th Committee Hearings

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Kenny Butler graduated as one of the most decorated members of the Pitzer College Class of 2022. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Pell Grants In Prison: A New Effort To Fund Degrees For People Behind Bars

There are 1.5 million people in state and federal prisons in the United States. Very few of them get a chance to earn a bachelor degree. That's due to a decades-old ban on the use of federal money to help people in prison pay for college classes.

Pell Grants In Prison: A New Effort To Fund Degrees For People Behind Bars

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President Joe Biden signs the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act into law in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Saturday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

On Gun Control, Two Big Steps In Opposite Directions

Congress and the Supreme Court took big steps in opposite directions last week, in the country's long standing debate on whether and how to regulate guns.

On Gun Control, Two Big Steps In Opposite Directions

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Detectives Lester Freamon (Clarke Peters, left) and Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West) kneel beside a body, befuddled. Nicole Rivelli/AP hide caption

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Nicole Rivelli/AP

Does HBO's 'The Wire' still hold up after 20 years?

Omar Little, Jimmy McNulty, Stringer Bell, Snot Boogie. If you recognize these names, you are probably a fan of the HBO series The Wire.

Does HBO's 'The Wire' still hold up after 20 years?

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Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court officially reversed Roe v. Wade, declaring that the constitutional right to abortion no longer exists. For nearly 50 years, Americans have had a constitutional right to an abortion. We're about to find out what the country looks like without one. The court's ruling doesn't mean a nationwide ban– it allows states to do what they want.

Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

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A "For Lease" sign is posted in front of a house available for rent on March 15, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Rental Market Is Wild Right Now

Listed rents are up 15% nationwide, and as much as 30% in some cities. At the same time, inflation and rising interest rates are pricing many buyers out of the housing market — increasing the pressure to rent. NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports that competition is so intense, some people find themselves in bidding wars.

The Rental Market Is Wild Right Now

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A fighter of the territorial defense unit, a support force to the regular Ukrainian army, holds a Kalashnikov gun decorated with Ukrainian flag. American and British foreigners have also traveled to the region to join the fighting. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

The Foreign Fighters Who've Gone To Ukraine

Two American citizens who'd traveled to Ukraine to join the fight against Russia have reportedly been captured by pro-Russian forces. The State Department says it's "closely monitoring" the situation and has urged Americans not to travel to the country, noting the risk and danger. But still, thousands of foreign fighters have journeyed there.

The Foreign Fighters Who've Gone To Ukraine

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