The NPR Politics Podcast Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

The NPR Politics Podcast

From NPR

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Most Recent Episodes

US President Joe Biden speaks during a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, on December 1, 2022. (Photo by Ludovic MARIN / AFP) (Photo by LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images) LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images

Whither, Iowa? Dems Consider Shaking Up Primary Season

The Democratic National Committee is meeting this week in Washington to decide whether Iowa should still have the first caucus in the party's presidential nominating contest. President Biden and others favor switching to a different state, arguing Iowa's population isn't representative of America as a whole.

Whither, Iowa? Dems Consider Shaking Up Primary Season

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Campaign materials sit on a table during a meet and greet campaign event with Georgia Democratic senate candidate U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) on November 26, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Will Georgia Voters End Joe Manchin's Reign As King Of The Senate?

All eyes are on Georgia's Senate runoff election as Democrat Raphael Warnock fights for his first full term. He's up against Republican Herschel Walker, a former college football celebrity and political newcomer who faced a number of allegations of abuse and personal misconduct. The race, which concludes on Tuesday, won't determine control of the Senate, but will determine how much influence more conservative senators like Joe Manchin have in crafting legislation.

Will Georgia Voters End Joe Manchin's Reign As King Of The Senate?

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Joe Biden, then the Democratic U.S. presidential nominee, speaks during a campaign stop at Pittsburgh Union Station September 30, 2020 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Why Biden And Congress Are Trying To Stop A Railroad Strike

Railroad unions rejected a Biden-brokered deal to prevent a national strike over concerns that it did not include paid sick leave. Now, the president is pushing Congress to implement it anyway. Biden — who has described himself as the most labor-friendly president in U.S. history — is worried that a rail workers' strike during the holiday season would devastate the economy.

Why Biden And Congress Are Trying To Stop A Railroad Strike

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Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY), leader of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, speaks during a news conference shortly after conceding to opponent Mike Lawler at the DCCC on November 9, 2022 in Washington, DC. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Here's How Republicans Pulled Off Big Upsets In New York State

GOP candidates there embraced "bipartisan" messaging and capitalized on redrawn maps to flip four House seats from Democratic control in New York. Democratic hopefuls also didn't benefit as much as candidates elsewhere from an enthusiasm boost among voters concerned about access to abortion because of the strong protections enshrined in state law. Coupled with Gov. Kathy Hochul's struggling top-of-the-ticket bid, Republicans found a perfect opportunity to secure narrow victories in the deep blue state.

Here's How Republicans Pulled Off Big Upsets In New York State

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Campaign signs for competing Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidates Doug Mastriano and Josh Shapiro sit in Mannheim, Pennsylvania on November 7, 2022. BRANDEN EASTWOOD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRANDEN EASTWOOD/AFP via Getty Images

Rural Voters, Latino Voters Defy Easy Narratives in Midterms

In Pennsylvania, Democratic candidates managed to turnout their rural supporters while many rural Republicans stayed home. And long-term under-investment in Latino voter engagement by Democrats continues to stymie the party's statewide hopes in places like Florida and Texas.

Rural Voters, Latino Voters Defy Easy Narratives in Midterms

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WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 08: House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) delivers remarks to supporters alongside Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chair, and Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), at a watch party at the Westin Hotel on November 9, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images) Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: November 25, 2022

The 2022 election season is winding to a close. What can Democrats and Republicans learn from their candidates' successes and failures in this midterm cycle — and can any of those lessons be applied to 2024?

Weekly Roundup: November 25, 2022

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US President Joe Biden pardons Chocolate, the National Thanksgiving Turkey, as he is joined by the National Turkey Federation Chairman Ronnie Parker (L) on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on November 21, 2022. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images) SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Spare A Thought For Sparing Turkeys?

It's a holiday tradition unlike any other — the annual pardoning of Thanksgiving turkeys. But not everybody is a fan of giving the birds clemency, especially if they've had to report on it for more than a decade straight.

Spare A Thought For Sparing Turkeys?

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The Republican Governor of Kansas and presidential candidate, Alfred Landon (1887 - 1987) greeting the American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) (seated) prior to the presidential elections. Future United States President Harry S. Truman can been seen in the background. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images) Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

How Do Election Polls Work?

Our colleagues at Planet Money had a simple question: how do pollsters do their work ahead of elections? They went to Marist College — home of the Marist Poll, which partners with NPR for its polling — to learn how to be pollsters. They break down the science of polling, and find out all the tricks that pollsters use to get people to finish their surveys.

How Do Election Polls Work?

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Alongside Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA) and Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV), Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a news conference about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) outside the U.S. Capitol. Democrats called on Republicans to join them in passing DACA legislation during the lame-duck session. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democrats Race Against Time

When the new Congress takes office in January, Democrats will lose control of the House of Representatives. Until that happens, they have a slew of legislative priorities, ranging from increasing the debt ceiling to codifying the right to same-sex and interracial marriages.

Democrats Race Against Time

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Clark County Election Department workers process polling place equipment and materials at an initial verification area at the Clark County Election Department after polls closed on November 08, 2022 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Misinformation's Limited Impact On The Midterms

Election observers were concerned misinformation would have an outsized impact on the 2022 elections, as it did in 2020. But, that ended up not being the case. Why?

Misinformation's Limited Impact On The Midterms

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