Latin NPR Music stories featuring Latin Alternative music.

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The Paths of Pain, The Caife Label, Quito 1960-68 and Cantoras: Rural Folk Singers of Venezuela 1972-1983 Honest Jon's Records/Odelia Records hide caption

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Honest Jon's Records/Odelia Records

Voices from the past in Ecuador and Venezuela

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Rubén Blades accepts the Best Salsa Album award on stage during the 22nd Annual Latin Grammy Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena Thursday in Las Vegas. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Latin Recording Academy hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Latin Recording Academy

Victoria Sur José Luis Martínez hide caption

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José Luis Martínez

Victoria Sur nets a Latin Grammy nomination with airy lullabies she wrote for her kids

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A Day of the Dead altar at a public shrine in the historic city center of Oaxaca, Mexico. Gabriel Perez/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Perez/Getty Images

Honor the Departed in Our Annual Sonic Altar

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Mon Laferte's 1940 Carmen is one of our picks for the best releases out on Oct. 29. Joel Orta/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joel Orta/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The top 10 albums out on Oct. 29

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Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000. Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

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Melissa Lozada-Oliva reimagines pop star Selena's legacy in Dreaming of You. Melissa Lozada-Oliva/Astra House hide caption

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Melissa Lozada-Oliva/Astra House

In 'Dreaming of You,' poet Melissa Lozada-Oliva reimagines Selena's legacy

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We take a look at a few greats, old and new: Vicente Fernandez, Susana Baca, Cimafunk. Reanna Cruz/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Reanna Cruz/NPR Illustration

Alt.Latino And NPR News: Musical Profiles From Mexico, Cuba and Peru

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Fans worry over ranchera icon Vicente Fernández, who remains hospitalized

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In the third part of our series exploring crossover in pop music, we reexamine the so-called "Latin explosion" of the '90s: what it was supposed to be for audiences across the U.S., and what it actually came to represent. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Pop-rock star Juanes (left) and Swedish singer-songwriter José González (right.) NPR Illustration hide caption

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NPR Illustration

Alt.Latino Unpacks the Latest Music News, Including Latin Grammy Drama

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Musician/activist Natalia Serna (aka La Muna) is featured in one of the stories from the border this week. Noelle Haro-Gomez./palaabra/NAHJ hide caption

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Noelle Haro-Gomez./palaabra/NAHJ

Humanity Has No Border on La Frontera

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