NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

All Things Considered

2013 Was A Tremendous Year...At Least For The Stock Market

Corrected on 2014-01-29T00:00:00-05:00

In this story, we identify Brad McMillan as chief financial officer of Commonwealth Financial Network. Actually, McMillan is chief investment officer.

Morning Edition

Pharrell Williams On Juxtaposition And Seeing Sounds

Corrected on 2013-12-31T00:00:00-05:00

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Pharrell Williams has been nominated for an Oscar. In fact, Williams has a song that's eligible, but nominations haven't been announced yet.

Morning Edition

Minister Defrocked Over Officiating Gay Wedding Will Appeal

Corrected on 2013-12-20T00:00:00-05:00

A previous Web introduction incorrectly said that the Rev. Frank Schaefer's congregation was unaware that he presided over his son's 2007 same-sex wedding until this year. In fact, the disciplinary proceedings were prompted by a parishioner's report to church authorities this year.

All Things Considered

Feminists Everywhere React To Beyonce's Latest

Corrected on 2013-12-19T00:00:00-05:00

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Sheryl Sandberg as CEO of Facebook. Sandberg is the COO.

All Things Considered

Is Silicon Valley Automating Our Obsolescence?

Corrected on 2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story — as did a previous Web version – misstated the original name of Silicon Valley. It was Valley of Heart's Delight, not Valley of Heavenly Delights.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Oh My, Ohio! Five States Named 'Most Likely To Curse'

Corrected on 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Marchex would be releasing state-by-state cursing information this week. It's actually a study on the businesses that get cursed at the most by consumers over the phone.

Morning Edition

A Baby Who Saved Her Family From 'The Dark Moments'

Corrected on 2013-12-13T00:00:00-05:00

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Francisco Vasquez became Ellie's godfather on Friday. In fact, the ceremony was moved up to Thursday.

Health Exchange Enrollment By State, In 2 Charts

Corrected on 2013-12-12T00:00:00-05:00

A previous version of the chart showing how many residents by state had selected a health plan in October and November used totals that were too high.

Morning Edition

China's Military Buildup Reignites Worries In Asia, Beyond

Corrected on 2013-12-06T00:00:00-05:00

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly noted that no one was killed during the 2001 collision between U.S. and Chinese aircraft in the South China Sea. In fact, a Chinese pilot died.

Morning Edition

Early Champions Of Bitcoin Reap Unexpected Windfall

Corrected on 2013-12-02T00:00:00-05:00

We say this week was the first time bitcoin's value reached $1,000. Actually, this week marked the second time bitcoin's value has hit that mark.

Morning Edition

Hondurans To Elect New President On Sunday

Corrected on 2013-11-22T00:00:00-05:00

In this story, we misstate the number of presidential candidates. There are eight, not nine. Also, the ruling party did not take part in the 2009 coup.

Morning Edition

Thanksgivukkah: A Mash Of Two Holidays That's Easy To Relish

Corrected on 2013-12-02T00:00:00-05:00

In the audio version of this story host David Greene references American Gothic as the classic image of a farmer and his wife. The image is actually of a farmer and his daughter.

Morning Edition

Little-Known Immigration Mandate Keeps Detention Beds Full

Corrected on 2013-11-19T00:00:00-05:00

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, says 870,000 immigrants who were ordered deported have absconded after being released from detention. In fact, some of those immigrants had not been detained prior to their absconding.

How Reporters Deal With Dark News

Corrected on 2013-11-18T00:00:00-05:00

A previous version of this story misquoted Ivan Watson as saying, "I've needed years of therapy to absorb and deal with some of the very complicated emotions that come from these kinds of experiences." He actually said, "I have made use of therapists to help and deal with the complicated emotions that come from these types of experiences."

Morning Edition

Dwindling Middle Class Has Repercussions For Small Towns

Corrected on 2013-11-13T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says the City Council increased the sales tax on businesses to renovate schools. In fact, the voters passed a referendum, requested by schools, imposing a sales tax for school programs.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Cumbia: The Music That Moves Latin America

Corrected on 2013-11-10T00:00:00-05:00

In earlier broadcasts of this segment, the first two songs were played in the wrong order. The song at the beginning of the segment was "Cumbia del Sol" by Carmen Rivero, but the next song, introduced as "Cumbia del Sol," was actually "Un Fuego de Cumbia" by Los Gaiteros de San Jacinto. In the audio at the top of this page, the songs play in the correct order.

Dolphins' Story Is About Race And Bullying, But Not The Way You Think

Corrected on 2013-11-08T00:00:00-05:00

An earlier version of this story identified Jonathan Martin as biracial, which is how he's been identified in news reports. But one of our colleagues at NPR who knows Martin's family personally told us that both of his parents are black.

Morning Edition

How The Affordable Care Act Pays For Insurance Subsidies

Corrected on 2013-11-19T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that dentist Aaron McLemore's new policy would boost his annual deductible to $7,000. In fact, the policy would nearly double his total out-of-pocket maximum liability for the year, but it would be less than $7,000.

All Things Considered

Michigan Works To Match Dropouts With Degrees Already Earned

Corrected on 2013-11-11T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, gives an incorrect name for the Lansing Community College program. It is "Credit When It's Due," not "Credit When Credit Is Due."

Weekend Edition Sunday

N.Y. Stop-And-Frisk Reforms On Hold For New Year, New Mayor

Corrected on 2013-11-07T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, implies that probable cause is required for the NYPD stop-and-frisk policy. In fact, reasonable suspicion – a lower standard – is the requirement.

All Things Considered

How One Kenyan Tribe Produces The World's Best Runners

Corrected on 2021-06-16T00:00:00-04:00

An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified David Epstein as a senior editor at Sports Illustrated. At the time this story was published, he had recently changed jobs from senior writer at Sports Illustrated to reporter with ProPublica.

An earlier version of this story also stated incorrectly that David Epstein told NPR that if one could measure the ankles and calves of runners at the Olympic starting line, one could statistically predict the winner. Epstein said that the Kalenjin tend to have extremely thin ankles and extremely thin calves, which improves their running economy.

An earlier version also stated academics told Epstein they had evidence of genetic advantage among different groups they wouldn't share. In fact, Epstein said academics had evidence of genetic differences unrelated to ability they wouldn't publish.

All Things Considered

Federal Appeals Court Stays Ruling Against NYPD Stop-And-Frisk

Corrected on 2013-11-07T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, implies that probable cause is required for the NYPD's stop-and-frisk policy. In fact, reasonable suspicion – a lower standard – is the requirement.

Morning Edition

Arguments Over Social Security Pit Old Vs. Young

Corrected on 2013-10-30T00:00:00-04:00

We say that if Congress takes no action, the Social Security reserve — or Trust Fund — will run dry in about 20 years. While this is accurate, this would not mean that Social Security benefits would stop. Because of the payroll tax, the Social Security Administration predicts that Social Security would still be able to pay about 75 percent of scheduled benefits.

All Things Considered

Top Reviewers On Amazon Get Tons Of Free Stuff

Corrected on 2013-10-30T00:00:00-04:00

The original version of this story displayed an image that included information from a newsletter sent by Amazon to frequent reviewers. It was not made clear to the person who provided the newsletter to NPR that the information would be published as part of the story. The image has since been removed.

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Corrected on 2013-10-28T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that besides West Virginia's secession from Virginia, the only other time a state seceded from an existing state was when Maine left Massachusetts. Additionally, a previous reference to 11 northeastern counties in Colorado was incorrect; while 10 of the counties are in the northeast, the 11th is actually in the northwest.
Morning Edition

Some Health Screenings May Harm More Than Help

Corrected on 2013-10-28T00:00:00-04:00

An earlier headline on this story referred to nonprofits offering health screening. The screening tests are often offered through nonprofit organizations but are performed by for-profit companies.
Morning Edition

What Congress Can Learn From Mayors

Corrected on 2013-10-24T00:00:00-04:00

In the edited version of this interview, Mesa, Ariz., Mayor Scott Smith is heard describing the town of Tucson, Ariz., as being near the entrance to the Grand Canyon, which is incorrect. In the original interview, he accurately described the town of Tusayan, Ariz., as near the entrance to the Grand Canyon.

All Things Considered

How A County Clerk Ignited The Gay Marriage Debate In N.M.

Corrected on 2013-10-23T00:00:00-04:00

A previous photo caption incorrectly said that the Dona Ana County Clerk's Office began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples for the first time in New Mexico history. In fact, a clerk in another county issued dozens of licenses to same-sex couples in 2004.

Morning Edition

At Guantanamo, 'Sketching' Defendants, Witnesses And KSM's Nose

Corrected on 2013-11-05T00:00:00-05:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says Janet Hamlin was the only courtroom sketch artist allowed into the secretive military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay when they began. While Hamlin was the only sketch artist at Guantanamo from 2006 to 2012, courtroom sketch artist Art Lien attended the 2004 tribunal at Guantanamo Bay.

It's Back To The Future For E-Cigarette Ads, At Least For Now

Corrected on 2013-10-22T00:00:00-04:00

A previous Web version of this story gave the impression that the Food and Drug Administration will ultimately be responsible for regulating e-cigarette advertising. It is not yet clear which federal agency, if any, will have the authority to regulate e-cigarette ads.
Weekend Edition Sunday

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

Corrected on 2013-10-21T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly identifies Joey M'Poko's parents as divorced and says that he ended up in Chicago a few years ago. In fact, his parents are not divorced, and he came to the U.S. about six months ago.

Morning Edition

'12 Years A Slave': 160 Years Later, A Memoir Becomes A Movie

Corrected on 2013-10-17T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that Uncle Tom's Cabin came out after Solomon Northup's memoir. In fact, Uncle Tom's Cabin came out first.

Fresh Air

Meet 'The Brothers' Who Shaped U.S. Policy, Inside And Out

Corrected on 2013-10-18T00:00:00-04:00

In the audio of this story, the title of Stephen Kinzer's previous book is misstated as Regime Change. The correct title is Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq.

All Things Considered

15 Years Later, Where Did All The Cigarette Money Go?

Corrected on 2013-10-15T00:00:00-04:00

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said Mike Moore was CEO of the American Legacy Foundation. He is on the board of directors.

Morning Edition

Shutdown Messes With Government Workers' Finances

Corrected on 2013-10-10T00:00:00-04:00

We incorrectly identify Lindy Lurie as a federal employee. Lurie works for the state of Massachusetts, but her income is dependent on federal funding.

All Things Considered

Vietnamese General Who Was Key Architect Of Tet Offensive Dies

Corrected on 2013-10-08T00:00:00-04:00

This story was prepared three years ago and includes observations by Giap biographer Cecil Currey, who died in March. Also, we misidentify the Australian Defence Force Academy as the Australian Defence Forces Academy.

Morning Edition

Legendary Vietnamese General Vo Nguyen Giap Dies

Corrected on 2013-10-08T00:00:00-04:00

This story was prepared three years ago and includes observations by Giap biographer Cecil Currey, who died in March. Also, Ted Morgan's book "Valley of Death: The Story of Dien Bien Phu," which we say is new, was published in 2010. Finally, we misidentify the Australian Defence Force Academy as the Australian Defence Forces Academy.

All Things Considered

Social Media Detectives: Is That Viral Video For Real?

Corrected on 2013-10-02T00:00:00-04:00

Previous audio and Web versions of this story could have been interpreted as suggesting that The New York Times might in some circumstances pay to embed a video from YouTube. This is not the case.

Fish Guidelines For Pregnant Women May Be Too Strict, Study Suggests

Corrected on 2013-10-03T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this story incorrectly described the relationship between food and blood mercury levels. The authors concluded that the 103 food items analyzed contributed about 17 percent to the differences in blood mercury levels seen across the women in the study.

The Panda Cam? That's Shut Down, Too

Corrected on 2013-10-01T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this story incorrectly reported that NASA's Curiosity Rover was forced to temporarily stop exploring the planet Mars.

'National Geographic' Celebrates 125 Years Of Photography

Corrected on 2013-10-01T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that the first photograph appeared on the cover of National Geographic magazine in 1943. The first photograph appeared on the cover in 1959.

No End In Sight As Government Shutdown Nears First Full Day

Corrected on 2013-10-02T00:00:00-04:00

We initially referred to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children — WIC — as "food stamps." That was incorrect. "Food stamps" is the colloquial name for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also referred to as SNAP.
Morning Edition

Forum Discusses Arctic Oil And Gas Searches

Corrected on 2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly identified professor Lawton Brigham as retired.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Sense Of Foreboding Lingers After Mall Bombing

Corrected on 2013-09-28T00:00:00-04:00

In the original audio for this story, the suicide bomber married to Samantha Lewthwaite was said to have blown up a train in Britain. To clarify, Germaine Lindsay was one of four bombers who attacked London's metro system in 2005.

All Things Considered

Gaza Strip Proves Uneven Refuge For Syrian Refugees

Corrected on 2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00

We incorrectly say that the 1948 war led to the creation of the state of Israel. In fact, it was the state's creation that led to the war.

This Law Wants To Save Teens' Reputations, But Probably Won't

Corrected on 2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this story said that the law doesn't address educating teens or making the delete button more accessible. In fact, the law does say affected websites must "provide notice to a minor ... that the minor may remove" content and "provide clear instructions to a minor ... on how the user may remove" it.
All Things Considered

Student Loan Changes Squeeze Historically Black Colleges

Corrected on 2013-09-27T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story — as did a previous Web version — misstates the current interest rate for a PLUS loan. It is 6.41 percent, not 7.9 percent.
Tell Me More

Questions Rise As Health Care Exchange Draws Near

Corrected on 2013-09-25T00:00:00-04:00

In the audio of this story, our guest refers to Medicare plans offered by private companies as Medicare Exchange. She meant to say Medicare Advantage.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Trader Joe's Ex-President To Turn Expired Food Into Cheap Meals

Corrected on 2013-09-26T00:00:00-04:00

An earlier Web version of this story gave the wrong name for the organization that co-authored a report with Harvard. It is the Natural — not National — Resources Defense Council.
Morning Edition

ACLU Posts Fed-Collected 'Suspicious' Activity Reports Online

Corrected on 2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story incorrectly refers to the GAO as the General Accounting Office. Previous Web versions mistakenly called it the General Accounting Office and the General Accountability Office. The correct name is Government Accountability Office.

All Things Considered

Why Will So Few Fans Go See The Cleveland Indians Play?

Corrected on 2013-09-19T00:00:00-04:00

In an earlier version of this story, we mistakenly said this season's Major League Baseball playoffs would be the first to feature two wild card teams in each league. It was actually the 2012 season that introduced the second wild card.

UPDATE: 'So, So Very Sorry,' Says Navy Yard Gunman's Mother

Corrected on 2013-09-18T00:00:00-04:00

J. Michael Slocum, an attorney for the Sharpshooters Range, initially told NPR that Aaron Alexis had visited the business on Sunday, Sept. 15. That's what we reported when we published this post. Now, Slocum says he was mistaken. He says Alexis went to the gun store on Saturday, Sept. 14. We have changed this post to reflect the new information.
Morning Edition

Navy Yard Shooter Struggled With Growing Mental Issues

Corrected on 2013-09-18T00:00:00-04:00

We say that Aaron Alexis bought his gun on Sunday. This information came from the lawyer for Sharpshooters Small Arms Range. However, the lawyer was incorrect; Alexis actually bought the gun on Saturday.

All Things Considered

What Is The Role Of Jails In Treating The Mentally Ill?

Corrected on 2015-06-05T00:00:00-04:00

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we refer to Sara Hough as a psychiatrist. In fact, she is a psychologist. Also, in 2013 she was a program head in the the Department of Mental Health at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility, not the head of clinical psychiatry.

All Things Considered

Writing Noir Poetry, With LA As A Backdrop

Corrected on 2013-09-17T00:00:00-04:00

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly identify Suzanne Lummis as the daughter of a California pioneer. She is the granddaughter.

Weekend Edition Sunday

50 Years After The Bombing, Birmingham Still Subtly Divided

Corrected on 2013-09-18T00:00:00-04:00

In our story, Birmingham, Ala., attorney Chervis Isom is referred to as a "reformed racist." That description falls short of adequately describing Isom's journey as a young man and neglects to provide a dimension on his change of heart over 50 years ago and the many changes that have taken place in Birmingham in the past half century. In Isom's interview with correspondent Debbie Elliott, he explained, "It was hard not to be a racist in those days when that's all you saw and heard," and, reflecting a transition experienced by many people in Birmingham over the decades, he added, "It was a long hard climb for me to come out of that milieu."
Morning Edition

Two Years On, Protesters Still Fighting Wisconsin Governor

Corrected on 2013-09-12T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that the crackdown began after a federal judge ruled that groups with more than 20 participants must get a permit. In fact, groups with more than 20 participants may be required to get a permit.

Morning Edition

Hannibal Buress And The Comedy Of The Unexpected

Corrected on 2013-09-23T00:00:00-04:00

In a previous Web version of this story, we said Hannibal Buress attended Eastern Illinois University. Actually, he attended Southern Illinois University.

What To Avoid At The Orthopedist's Office

Corrected on 2013-09-12T00:00:00-04:00

The original version of this post said that an orthopedic surgeons' group recommended against ultrasound exams to look for life-threatening blood clots after joint replacement surgery. The recommendation against ultrasound exams is limited only to people in the hospital who have had hip or knee replacement surgery and do not have symptoms of deep vein thrombosis. It does not refer to ultrasound screening in other situations.

Are You Ready For Some Controversy? The History Of 'Redskin'

Corrected on 2013-09-09T00:00:00-04:00

A previous version of this story misidentified writer Ian Crouch as Ian Crouther.


Clarification: We previously misstated Darrell Green's remarks to D.C. radio station WTOP, saying that Green had said the team should consider changing its name. The former Washington Redskins player actually told WTOP that the team should have a conversation about a name change.

Morning Edition

Assessing Role Extremists Play In Syrian Opposition

Corrected on 2013-09-07T00:00:00-04:00

In this interview, Elizabeth O'Bagy was identified as a senior analyst with the Institute for the Study of War. She also works on a contractual basis with the Syrian Emergency Task Force, a subcontractor with the United States and British governments which also advocates on behalf of the Syrian opposition. O'Bagy insists her work is separate from the group's political advocacy.

Morning Edition

Tina Brown: Women Are Terrifyingly Vulnerable In Many Places

Corrected on 2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00

In the original version of this interview, Tina Brown said that journalist Amanda Lindhout had a child as a result of being raped while she was held in Somalia. Lindhout writes about the experience in her book A House In the Sky and says that claims she had a child by one of her rapists are not true.

Morning Edition

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Corrected on 2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that by the 1970s, there were fewer than 500 eagle nests in the United States. That number refers to the number of nests in the Lower 48.

Jury Says You Can't Say That Word. Period

Corrected on 2013-09-10T00:00:00-04:00

In a previous version of this post, we incorrectly identified Marjorie Sharpe as the judge in this case. Sharpe was the plaintiff's attorney. We also said the judge awarded damages. It was a federal jury that did so.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Last Flight Of Ethiopia-To-Israel Jewish Migration Program

Corrected on 2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, theorizes that ancestors of Jewish Ethiopians fled Jerusalem during wars with Rome around 500 B.C. We should have said wars with Babylon. The audio introduction also says the migration program began nearly 40 years ago. We should have said nearly 30 years.

Morning Edition

Cats Plus Online Videos Equal Precious

Corrected on 2013-08-28T00:00:00-04:00

In the audio of this story, we imply that the winner of the Golden Kitty Award was to be announced on Tuesday, Aug. 27. We should have said Wednesday, Aug. 28.

All Things Considered

Inside The 'Bossless' Office, Where The Team Takes Charge

Corrected on 2013-08-26T00:00:00-04:00

This post originally said that former Valve employee Jeri Ellsworth's comments were made in a Wired magazine podcast. The podcast is actually the Grey Area podcast and Ellsworth's comments were reported by Wired.
All Things Considered

Hacker-Artist's Mantra: 'Fun Makes The Politics Go Down'

Corrected on 2019-01-11T00:00:00-05:00

A previous version of this story incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

Weekend Edition Saturday

'Bummers, Blisters And Boondoggles': A Jokester Joins The Army

Corrected on 2013-08-27T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says the U.S. Army raised the American flag over Iwo Jima in World War II. Actually, it was the U.S. Marine Corps that led the invasion and ground fighting in the Battle of Iwo Jima. Five Marines and a Navy corpsman were photographed raising the American flag atop Mount Suribachi.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Cutting Public Defenders Can Cost Federal Government More

Corrected on 2013-08-26T00:00:00-04:00

The audio version of this story, as in a previous Web version, may give the impression that Norman Reimer views private defense attorneys as less effective than public defenders in federal criminal cases. Reimer does not hold this view. He opposes budget cuts to both public defenders and private lawyers hired by the government.

Morning Edition

Where The Whale Sharks Go

Corrected on 2013-08-22T00:00:00-04:00

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, mistakenly refers to Stony Brook University's Demian Chapman as Demian Campbell.

Morning Edition

'You're What I Wanted': Assembling The Family Stone

Corrected on 2013-08-22T00:00:00-04:00

A previous audio version of this story refers to "Everyday People" as Sly & The Family Stone's "first big hit." That song was the group's first to reach No. 1 on the Billboard charts but "Dance to the Music," which was released earlier and reached No. 8, was considered the group's groundbreaking song.

All Things Considered

What's Behind Romania's Church Building Spree?

Corrected on 2013-08-26T00:00:00-04:00

A previous online description of this audio story incorrectly stated that Codrescu noted the complicity of the Romanian Catholic Church, not the Orthodox Church, in both World War II and Communist-era wrongs.

Morning Edition

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

Corrected on 2013-08-19T00:00:00-04:00

Previous audio and Web versions of this story misidentified volunteer Julia Baldwin, who helps staff a library in Ludlow, Vt., as Julia Bailey.